Author Topic: Sanding Break  (Read 7763 times)

Offline Mountain

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Re: Sanding Break
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2012, 08:07:02 PM »
I still have 4 gallons to use. I may need to get a haz mat suit.

Offline scrinch

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Re: Sanding Break
« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2012, 11:25:11 PM »
Quote
I still have 4 gallons to use. I may need to get a haz mat suit.
...or really take to heart what the workboat/go-fishing-sooner guys are saying and put away your sandpaper!  :)

Offline Grady300

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Re: Sanding Break
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2012, 06:01:49 AM »
Hire someone to sand for you $15 bucks an hour is well worth it not to sand. I hired out about 20 hours of sanding worth every penny. Best $300 bucks I spent on the boat, I should also say I just had them do the rough sanding when I used them.
Chuck M.
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21' 4" Wide Body Launch Oct. 2012

Offline Brewboy

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Re: Sanding Break
« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2012, 07:21:20 AM »
Might help if you had one of these

http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Tools/Pages/BoschProductDetail.aspx?pid=1250DEVS

It hooks up right to the central vacuum/ shop vac and keeps the sanding dust from floating around the shop.
22 Jumbo Started 8/15/2009
22 Jumbo Flipped 10/22/2009

This post is hand made by the artist and therefore subject to the artists interpretations regarding spelling, grammar and sentence structure.

Offline jerry bark

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Re: Sanding Break
« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2012, 09:48:37 AM »
Quote
I still have 4 gallons to use. I may need to get a haz mat suit.
...or really take to heart what the workboat/go-fishing-sooner guys are saying and put away your sandpaper!  :)

that is what I did. I was getting very itchy whenever I sanded anything with epoxy/glass no rash fortunately, just itchy. so I called it fair enough and moved on. I was finishing the gunwales/shelves at the time. I glassed the rest and finished out the inside without issue, but also without sanding anything more. I simply scraped what I felt needed it and painted.

the fish don't seem to mind.

I hope you are back on task soon,
cheers
Jerry
Tolman Widebody Skiff built in 2011

Sturgis, Michigan

Offline narvik

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Re: Sanding Break
« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2012, 02:58:36 PM »
Hei,
hope you are better and your skin is healing.
If you start being allergic to the epoxy and the sanding dust one would suspect that all your skin reacts, e.g. other unprotected areas as the neck or your face. I would also assume that you would get some irritation of your airways or other mucosa. (running nose, coughing, itching eyes) If it is just your hands I would suspect that the gloves are your problem.
Buy a different brand and use nitrile gloves as these are supposed to be best if you use epoxy. Avoid any gloves that use any other substances like talcum or starch. These will fit better, due to the moisture absorbing powder, but there are lots of known allergic reactions because of these.
Try to keep your hands as dry as possible when you use gloves or change gloves. Moisture will support any allergy. It could be an option to put on an extra pair of normal working gloves, single use gloves are not made to withstand sanding paper or other hard working situations. If your skin is sore while you want to continue working you could use cotton gloves before you put the nitrile gloves on.

If you find any brand that works well, stick with it, surgeons do the same to avoid problems further on.

Even if it is uncomfortable, you could maybe test yourself: take some masking tape or a similar medical tape and glue a small sample of the dust to any skin that is not yet affected. Do the same with a sample from your gloves. After a couple of hours you will know. Do not do that if you have had any severe allergy before or if you have associated problems like asthma or similar.

The allergy testing at your doctors is following the same scheme, they will expose small skin areas to any suspected substance to identify the source of your problem.

Once you identify and kind of allergy you should be careful and not expose yourself to the same substance any further, at least use the best protection available.

Get well soon
Peter