Author Topic: 12 inch disc sander  (Read 8340 times)

Offline narvik

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12 inch disc sander
« on: January 14, 2015, 12:16:23 PM »
Hei,
cold and dark winter days here in Norway. Not even the slightest chance to warm up the shop, at least not to epoxy curing temperatures. I have been reading through some woodworking books, and some highly recommend a disc sander as a "must" in your shop. E.g. http://www.deltamachinery.com/products/sanders/item/31-140?category_id=7
Would like to hear any recommendations. Useful and necessary or overkill... I already own a small (75mm width) belt sander and there are some DIY jigs one could use to clamp the sander rectangular to the workbench, thus using it at least close to +/- 90 degrees
I have a tradition to save all money from overtime to benefit the shop.
Dark and cold days feed my shopping mood. :-)
So, is it useful, not just for the sake of the boat: yes or no?
Peter

Offline Dave B

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2015, 01:19:54 PM »
Peter,

There's probably lots of opinions, but there's a lot of other tools I'd buy before that. In fact I used to have a cheap one similar to that and eventually sold it to make room in the shop. I haven't missed it.
Dave B

Offline Tebubaga

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2015, 08:50:41 PM »
Here's a statement.  ;D

I bought a six inch random orbital variable speed sander and it's the only thing I used for sanding throughout my entire build.

I never did any scraping anywhere, or anytime, on my build. Wait until the epoxy is just past the tacky, sticky stage, but don't let it completely set up, judiciously hit it with 60 grit and you're good to go. Occasionally I'd move up to 100 or 150 grit to smooth things out, it's all a matter of touch.

My opinion?

You can achieve a very nice finish on your boat by doing clean, careful epoxy work, cleaning up drips or sags as, or just after, they happen and not letting them harden completely. Careful fairing using a long straight edge completely eliminates the need for sanding.

Don't wait to clean up your oopsies or messes, epoxy will cure and be harder than the surrounding wood and when you try and sand it, what do you think will come off first?  ;)
Russ (Juneau)
Built a J24. Extreme details at:
http://tolmanskiff.blogspot.com/

Offline SalmonMan

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2015, 10:56:08 PM »
Here's a statement.  ;D

I bought a six inch random orbital variable speed sander and it's the only thing I used for sanding throughout my entire build.

I never did any scraping anywhere, or anytime, on my build. Wait until the epoxy is just past the tacky, sticky stage, but don't let it completely set up, judiciously hit it with 60 grit and you're good to go. Occasionally I'd move up to 100 or 150 grit to smooth things out, it's all a matter of touch.

My opinion?

You can achieve a very nice finish on your boat by doing clean, careful epoxy work, cleaning up drips or sags as, or just after, they happen and not letting them harden completely. Careful fairing using a long straight edge completely eliminates the need for sanding.

Don't wait to clean up your oopsies or messes, epoxy will cure and be harder than the surrounding wood and when you try and sand it, what do you think will come off first?  ;)

Good advice!

What 6" random orbital variable speed sander do you recommend?

Offline Dave B

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2015, 11:25:37 AM »
99% of my sanding is with a R/O sander. My workhorse for years has been an old Porter Cable 6". When its bearings began to recently go out (I had them replaced once years ago) I decided it was time for a new one.

After considerable research I went with a Bosch 1250 DEVS, which I'm extremely happy with. You can switch it between aggressive (no r/o) or extra smooth (r/o). It's the best of both worlds and also has dust collection that I hook to my vac.
Dave B

Offline cgrfish

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2015, 11:50:42 AM »
I'll throw in another vote for the Bosch 1250.   I bought a new one when I purchased the boat, and it is a great tool.  The ability to hook it to a shop vac if fantastic when sanding the epoxy and glass.
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Offline Tebubaga

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2015, 09:08:37 PM »
I bought a Ridgid from Home Depot. I could have bought more expensive, but I thought I'd try this one as I've never owned one and see if it would meet my needs during the build and it turned out to be all I needed.

Oh, being able to hook it up to a shop-vac is a huge plus too. Keeps the dust out of the air and out of your lungs.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2015, 09:14:37 PM by Tebubaga »
Russ (Juneau)
Built a J24. Extreme details at:
http://tolmanskiff.blogspot.com/

Offline MoPoxy

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2015, 09:21:44 PM »
six inch random orbital variable speed sander

I love my 6RO. It is great as a shaper also. It will leave swirlies in your final top coat if you are not diligent about follow up sanding.

Wait until the epoxy is just past the tacky, sticky stage, but don't let it completely set up, judiciously hit it with 60 grit and you're good to go.

If you use non-blushing epoxy, sanding is not necessary.

If using blushing epoxy, sanding at that point is fruitless because the epoxy hasn't blushed yet. That is why that is the perfect time to recoat or bond without sanding. Sanding at that point is fruitless because the blush forms at the end of curing, only on the surface exposed to oxygen at up to 72 hours after mixing. While you are off preparing for the next step in your build, the blush is forming on your freshly sanded surface.

Offline Tebubaga

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2015, 09:39:53 PM »
Ahhh, I wasn't referring to dealing with blush. I was referring to removing unwanted epoxy, squeeze out on scarfs being an example.

Blush is a composite of environment and choice of epoxy. I used Aeromarine and even though I live in a rain forest with very high humidity I never had a problem with blush. I used a dehumidifier to keep the humidity to somewhere between 35% and 40% with no issues over the course of my nine month build.
Russ (Juneau)
Built a J24. Extreme details at:
http://tolmanskiff.blogspot.com/

Offline penguin

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12 inch disc sander
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2015, 06:51:25 AM »
I bought a Ridgid from Home Depot. I could have bought more expensive, but I thought I'd try this one as I've never owned one and see if it would meet my needs during the build and it turned out to be all I needed.

Oh, being able to hook it up to a shop-vac is a huge plus too. Keeps the dust out of the air and out of your lungs.

I got a 5 inch Milwaukee RO sander on sale.  Like you, I have never used one before as all I had was a Ridgid 1/4 sheet finishing sander. What a difference!  The random orbital is much better.  Both hook up to my shop vac, which is great as you mentioned.
Rod

Offline tananaBrian

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2015, 08:07:06 AM »
All good recommendations.  The only thing that I would add is a couple of things that I learned the hard way.  First, make sure you check the screws that hold the sanding pad itself to the sander ...if they come loose just a little, then all that vibration can damage the sanding pad and the whole show can eventually come apart.  Simple to check those screws now and then.  The other thing is that you'll notice over time that the sander doesn't stop spinning as easily.  Notice that when the sander is not under any load (on, but just holding it up and looking at it), that the sanding pad spins ...but stops spinning and just vibrates when in contact with whatever you're sanding.  When it's new, you can start up the sander, put the sand paper right on the palm of your hand and it'll stop immediately.  Over time, you'll notice that it doesn't stop quite so immediately, and eventually ...it'll even spin with gusto and grind up your hand for you (or the wood/glass etc LOL).  There is a plastic pad type thing with plastic ridges on it underneath the sanding pad.  The ridges on it contact the back of the sanding pad and act like a brake that helps prevent the spinning ...take off the sanding pad and you'll see it.  This braking pad does wear out.  They are extremely cheap.  Replacing them is usually easy ...just take the sanding pad off, remove about 4 screws to split the plastic shell around the brake pad, and remove the pad.  I've replaced sanders that didn't need replacing before I learned about that brake pad and how cheap and easy it was to replace ...I think it's a good idea to keep 2 or 3 around all the time, just so when you notice that your sander is no longer behaving, is digging in and adding swirls in the glass or wood when it touches down, then you can change out that brake pad in about 10 minutes and your sander will work as good as new again...

Brian

« Last Edit: January 16, 2015, 08:09:51 AM by tananaBrian »
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Offline penguin

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12 inch disc sander
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2015, 10:24:55 AM »
I had a similar repair experience with my 1/4 sheet finishing sander. Because it was the only one I had and was used a lot for everything by everyone, the rubber pad was getting all gouged and uneven, basically beat up and worn out.  This resulted in a lousy sanding surface and the metal edges under the rubber pad were connecting the surfaces being sanded and tearing the paper etc.

I looked up the parts diagram on the Ridgid web site (the part is called a platen, I think) and got the part number. Called my local Ridgid authorized repair shop and got it for $2.55 including taxes! Sander is like new!

I suppose I could have sent the sander for repair under their lifetime warranty, but for the price of a fancy cup of coffee I was back in business. (I view it as wear and tear and not a warranty matter anyway.)
Rod

Offline narvik

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2015, 01:16:55 PM »
Thank you all for your comments,
I use a R/O sander from festool and it is one of my favorite tools. The 12 inch sander (or 305mm) is a stationary tool for sanding cuts and edges, to some extent it can also be used to prepare or even sharpen metal tools. E.g. cabinets, hatches or details inside the cabin or helm. I was thinking about general shop equipment, not about specific "Tolman" tools. So, in terms of "general-shop-use": any recommendations?

Peter

Offline scrinch

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2015, 01:37:43 AM »
I've used the 12" disc sander attachment on my Shopsmith a handful of times. It was useful for truing up and rough sanding a few dozen slats I cut for a cherry bed I was making, and I use it to true up and smooth an end cut occasionally. I think it  is the type of tool that is useful once in a while, but takes up a lot of room for how little it gets used.

Offline Dave

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Re: 12 inch disc sander
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2015, 08:07:43 AM »
Narvik, I agree with Scrinch.  Too seldom needed to justify buying it as a stand-alone tool.  If I found a task that absolutely required a disc sander I would use the tablesaw  a disc like this:

http://www.amazon.com/CMT-299-112-00-Table-Balance-Sanding/dp/B000P4LRMG
Dave in Homer
GA26 (FABDFH)