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Author Topic: battery boxes  (Read 1836 times)
dldobler
Able Seaman
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Moonbeam Widebody 21-6


« on: June 05, 2008, 04:41:07 PM »

Dear Friends:

I'm installing two group 31 batteries.  What are successful ways others have found to stow batteries securely while making installing and changing them effortless and back-friendly?

Thanks,

David
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"He that will learn to pray, let him go to sea."

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NSchlee
Second Mate
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Posts: 839


Jumbo 22


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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2008, 04:46:49 PM »

I used trays instead of boxes, but my bats are in a contained area.  Two group 31's is a lot of power, I have 2 Group 24's in my Jumbo and it always has been plenty of power and offers some wt. savings.

Neal
Skiffkits LLC
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NSchlee
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Jumbo 22


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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2008, 04:49:31 PM »

A couple of pics.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2008, 04:52:21 PM by NSchlee » Logged

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walknbob
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24'5" Jumbo


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« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2008, 06:01:17 PM »

What are successful ways others have found to stow batteries securely while making installing and changing them effortless and back-friendly?

Hello David

I placed my two batteries (plain old deep cycle marine batts, about 40 lbs each) just inside the rear cabin bulkhead and just outside of the stringers. My thinking was this keeps them protected from water (ie rain or the errant bad wave) and puts them at low midship for weight and balance. I am not sure how you would think of this as being ergonomic but I don't expect to have to pull them but once a year. I have run into a problem though. That is how to cover the cross wires and have a door that covers them from view. As I see it it is an asthetics thing more than anything else but just the same I didn't fully think it through before hand. I am including a couple pics to illustrate.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2008, 06:11:17 PM by walknbob » Logged

WalknBob aka Bob Southwick - Anchor Point Alaska
The risk of collision became an issue the day the second boat was built.
tolman_paul
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Posts: 1175



« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2008, 06:37:11 PM »

I'll take a picture of my setup, and I still have the aesthetic and shorting issue of properly covering them.  I have a plan, just haven't had the time to execute it Wink
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dldobler
Able Seaman
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Posts: 229


Moonbeam Widebody 21-6


« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2008, 12:49:10 AM »

Thank you all.  The pictures really help.  I chose 31's because the Tohatsu manual calls for 110ah "in cold locations".  My design trip was Seward to Homer, now Sitka to Pelican, so the bank size I'm fine with.  They are sitting in the entry now, and they aren't bantams;-) ; I am mentally constructing a seat/cabinet around them.  As I have thought about weight distribution I am balancing the kicker (transom port) with the batteries (pilothouse/starboard).    Like many, I want the battery weight in the mid-ship, not stern.

David
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kchace
Second Mate
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Posts: 819


Brookline NH


« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2008, 07:15:01 AM »

  My batteries are in the stern to help balance the weight of my pretty comprehensive cabin. I have fairly large compartments in the stern and one group 24 combination starting/deep cycle battery in each. The batteries are in standard plastic battery boxes held down with *metal* loops and strong straps. I can sit next to the compartment and reach right in when it comes time to remove the cables and drag the batteries right out to the deck. Once on the deck I can pick them up without resorting to any difficult bending.

  Ken
« Last Edit: June 06, 2008, 07:21:14 AM by kchace » Logged

Ken Chace
The Lucky C
25' Jumbo
steveoh
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« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2008, 08:08:49 AM »

Ken, if I had my druthers I'd go back and build my splash well and battery comparts, and sump just like you've done. Beautiful!

Steveoh

  My batteries are in the stern to help balance the weight of my pretty comprehensive cabin. I have fairly large compartments in the stern and one group 24 combination starting/deep cycle battery in each. The batteries are in standard plastic battery boxes held down with *metal* loops and strong straps. I can sit next to the compartment and reach right in when it comes time to remove the cables and drag the batteries right out to the deck. Once on the deck I can pick them up without resorting to any difficult bending.

  Ken
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kchace
Second Mate
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Posts: 819


Brookline NH


« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2008, 09:20:37 AM »

  Thanks Steve. It really works well. I've had to change it a bit to accommodate a fuel fill and vent when I moved my tank aft, but it does work well.

  With this setup and 28" of freeboard I simply don't get water into the boat, but I was able to give it a test last week. I backed down as hard as I could into 2-3' short chop. While the engine and splashwell got a serious bath, almost no water came in. What did manage to splash in quickly disappeared into the sump and was whisked away by the primary pump's auto feature.

  That reminds me, I've done so much 'finish' work to my boat over the winter - I really need to send you some new pictures to post.

  Ken
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Ken Chace
The Lucky C
25' Jumbo
AlasKen
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Eagle River, AK


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« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2008, 11:29:31 AM »

As some of you know I went very utilitarian on my cabin interior.  A simple open box with bulkheads and seat.  Open to the front.  I also went simple with the batteries.  In the compartment on the starboard side next to the rear bulkhead I installed my starter battery and switch.  I will be adding a house battery and switch opposite on the port side soon.  I made the cables long enough that I can slide the battery to the center and add or remove them.  I have the battery sitting in a plastic battery box and slid to the outside of the box.  I have a plywood bracket that I screw to the floor with 3 screws.  To remove the battery I remove the 3 screws and remove the bracket.  I am using a 27 AGM from West Marine because that was all I could find when I was ready to go out last year.  It has power to spare.  I also carry my tool kit and a jump power pack in the same compartment.  Everything is open and easy to find.  I may not have the nicest looking interior but I can haul a lot of stuff in it and it is pretty easy to find.
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Kenneth Dodson
Crystal Dawn
24' Jumbo
SmokinFletch
Second Mate
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Posts: 857


I got a boat building problem!


« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2008, 01:36:28 AM »

I ,myself, like your set-up. Keep the pictures coming. 
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adam_kondrashoff
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« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2008, 09:11:27 PM »

Ken, if I had my druthers I'd go back and build my splash well and battery comparts, and sump just like you've done. Beautiful!

Steveoh

Steve,

You would prefer a deck with a sump over self bailing?  I am asking because soon I will be to this stage, and I am not partial to either.

Adam
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kchace
Second Mate
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Posts: 819


Brookline NH


« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2008, 07:01:04 AM »

Thanks Adam, I went with the sump because I had already had my fill of scuppers that didn't drain well and I was unwilling to raise my deck 2" or more because I also wanted as much freeboard as possible. Without scuppers and with a lot of freeboard water just doesn't come in - so I don't have to worry much about draining it. If I do get water, I have 2 pumps - each with completely separate manual switches, auto switches and batteries.

  Ken
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Ken Chace
The Lucky C
25' Jumbo
gmclain
Second Mate
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Posts: 917


22' widebody


« Reply #13 on: June 09, 2008, 08:51:13 AM »

I am with you on the enough water coming in unwanted. I have sloped the floor in my cockpit 1 1/2" from the rear of the cabin to the transom, there will be 2 pumps, one automatic switched and on manual on. then I have also put a 2 1/2" lip above the deck with a cut out to keep water from entering the cabin. In the event water does some how get into the cabin there will also be a pump intalled under the step at the back of the cabin. I know overkill three pumps total. However if anyone has waited out rainstorms in a cabin where the water is running into and all of a sudden the "dry" area is not dry anymore they will completely understand.
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kchace
Second Mate
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Posts: 819


Brookline NH


« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2008, 11:03:11 AM »

I hear you loud and clear. Before I moved my 52 gallon belly tank from amidships to very close to the transom, my boat would sit perfectly level with no one in it(as referenced to the main stringers). Add people in the helm area or worse yet - in the cabin - and water would flow towards the cabin. Kevin Beddoe also noted this with his Jumbo (which has TWO 52 gallon belly tanks!) This balance issue on my boat also caused obvious (to me) running problems due to the fact that I couldn't get the bow out of the water properly when on plane. Moving the tank aft has made a HUGE difference for the better. At rest, the bow sits about 2.5-3" higher than the stern and the handling and adjustability through the use of engine trim when on plane is now excellent. Water now drains properly even with 2 people sleeping in the cabin.

BTW - I think sloping the deck is a GREAT idea and would have done it myself if I had thought of it in time.

  Ken
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Ken Chace
The Lucky C
25' Jumbo
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