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91
General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: New build in VA finally starting...
« Last post by Oyster on June 20, 2016, 07:51:58 AM »
I don't know it to be a fact. But I think he was speaking about having the stringers rabbited into the transom plywood, which is my preferred method.
92
General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: New build in VA finally starting...
« Last post by BobC on June 20, 2016, 06:35:38 AM »
GS,

No, I went ahead and screwed spacer blocking between my stringers to keep them square and paralell and leveled them all up on the jig cart without setting the transom.  I could be wrong as I am lots of times but it seemed to me easier to have the fairbody and stringers all in precision alignment and glued together as one solid unit before setting the transom, rather than trying to adjust 4 parts at once.  So far it has been pretty quick and straightforward and I am very pleased with the way it all fits.  Will keep you posted on the transom.

I pulled all the screws out this AM.  All the holes will get filled with epoxy.
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General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Longboard Sanding
« Last post by BobC on June 20, 2016, 06:27:09 AM »
I like the hook-it style, kind auto body shops use, paper is 2 3/4" wide and you can get it in rolls or sheets.  Dura-block sanding blocks you can get up to 48" and up to 4 1/2" wide.

I have never tried 4 1/2" wide sandpaper but lots of 2 3/4" and a 2' board would probably do a great finish.  Dura blocks are fairly stiff but not like a piece of wood and you can purposely put pressure i the middle of the board or not just depends on the contour you want.

It is hard to beat hook n loop sand paper, use it for a bit switch to finer and back no problem, with the adhesive paper you throw it away use it for hand sanding.  We use to use the clamp style sandpaper but those suck.

Did the pros use 4 1/2 sandpaper?

Here is what they used, copied from the Jamestown Distributors catalog.



The Rigid fairing board is often be used for large flat areas such as freeboard and deck areas. The Flexible fairing board is best for concave and convex curved areas such as hulls.

"The 3M Marine Hookit Fairing Longboards utilize 4-1/2" x 30" 3M Hookit Abrasive Sheets. 3M Imperial Stikit Abrasives 4-1/2" wide in roll form may also be used with these longboards.

 

I beleive it was the 80 grit paper we used and no it didn;t produce a lot of fine dust. It was heavy fluffy dust, pretty easy to clean up.

 The longer boards distribute the pressure and keep things straighter. I would not recommend using smaller boards if you want a fair finish.  It will likley produce holes and a ripple effect.  :(

To Dave N. 's point, if you aren't looking for a yacht finish, you could just take down the highspots with a DA power sander and call it good.  If you are going to take the bother of longboarding and fairing, do it right.  I doubt it will take any more time than doing it with something less and when you are done you will have a better finish.  It took 3 guys about 3-4 hours longboarding to put a 37' boat in pretty good shape.  The boat was decent to start with but it was strip plank rather than S&G plywood so theoretically it should have had more fairing to do than a fully developed panel hull.   Of course that depends on how rough your skills were on putting it together.

94
General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: New build in VA finally starting...
« Last post by GS on June 20, 2016, 04:53:17 AM »
???? Bob you didn't set the transom up to support the stringers before putting on your bottom? A lot of ways to skin a cat, but some are harder than others.
95
General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Longboard Sanding
« Last post by GS on June 20, 2016, 04:50:28 AM »
I found a 12" drywall sanding board with the foam backing and 80 grit worked better than anything. Sanding went real fast and the thin foam backing made the pressure feel just right and helped with curves. The dust seems to just fall when sanding rather than become airborne.
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General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Jumbo in VT (by elephant bites)
« Last post by GS on June 20, 2016, 04:45:13 AM »
Good thread Mo. I will get creative and omit the copper pipe part. I still like the idea of the pathway around the stem over an eyebolt.
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General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Jumbo in VT (by elephant bites)
« Last post by Mo 'Poxy on June 19, 2016, 10:34:39 PM »
For the bow pipe. I  was bored one night so I drilled them

There is a really bad pun in there somewhere. Something like, "I got bored so they got bored."

Before using copper for your bow pipe, review this thread
http://fishyfish.com/boards/index.php?topic=3706.msg38029
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General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Longboard Sanding
« Last post by Rbob on June 19, 2016, 09:31:17 PM »
I like the hook-it style, kind auto body shops use, paper is 2 3/4" wide and you can get it in rolls or sheets.  Dura-block sanding blocks you can get up to 48" and up to 4 1/2" wide.

I have never tried 4 1/2" wide sandpaper but lots of 2 3/4" and a 2' board would probably do a great finish.  Dura blocks are fairly stiff but not like a piece of wood and you can purposely put pressure i the middle of the board or not just depends on the contour you want.

It is hard to beat hook n loop sand paper, use it for a bit switch to finer and back no problem, with the adhesive paper you throw it away use it for hand sanding.  We use to use the clamp style sandpaper but those suck.

Did the pros use 4 1/2 sandpaper?

   

99
General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Longboard Sanding
« Last post by narvik on June 19, 2016, 09:06:39 PM »
Hei,
I bought a plastic longboard with sandpaper to suit, adhesives on the back. Did not work well. The sandpaper was of poor quality and the adhesive was either too weak or too strong. Biggest problem was to get it off, at least after a couple of days. And way too expensive. Took my time to realize that, but the second time I went for supplies the price per sheet didn't feel right.
Longboards are cheap if you use one of the larger automotive stores and they sell large rolls of sandpaper as well. A metal clip at each end outperforms adhesives.
I just used coarse sandpaper with the longboard and used a random orbit sander to finish.
Peter
100
General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Longboard Sanding
« Last post by BobC on June 19, 2016, 08:15:01 PM »
I long boarded with some of the carolina boys a little over a week ago for 2 days to see how the pros did it.  They had 2 different types of longboards.  One was flexible while the other was rigid.  the flexible board was used for sanding areas with curvature while the rigid board was used for flat areas.  They were both about 3-4 feet long. 

I don't see why you couldn't fabricate a homebrew version out of som e good quality 3/8" plywood.  It should be about right for the flexible style.  The rigid board could also be fabricated out of the same material but with a stiffener  epoxied to the back of it to give it some additional strength and stiffness.

The trick I learned in longboarding with them is that you always sand at angles.  45 degree up and down in a criss/cross motion.  Your sanding pattern should look like crosshatch pattern on the side of the boat.  Kinda like burnishing on a cylinder bore.  any thing other than this will make for grooves and be counter productive.

Board it until most of the surface is dull but not until you sand through the epoxy or glass.  The shiny spots are low.  Hand sand them with a little 80 grit and pull some fairing compound in them then go back and hit it again with the longboard.   If you try to longboard out the shiny spots, you will just make a larger area that has to be pulled with fairing compound and make yourself additional work.  After everything was pretty fair, the did hit it with a power grinder with a big sheet of paper.  (Dave would have liked this part but not the first  ;))  Of course this boat will sell for the price of several modest homes so they were going for a yacht finish.

That all I know.  Hope it helps.  I plan to build a longboard as well.  Post some pics up of yours and let us know how it works.
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