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 51 
 on: December 13, 2014, 06:56:54 PM 
Started by David Nolan - Last post by adam_k
The superjumbo is another critter, its built 8'6" wide and the stringers extend past the transom and become part of an outboard motor bracket.  Neal from Skiffkits designed it.

 52 
 on: December 13, 2014, 06:25:07 PM 
Started by David Nolan - Last post by penguin
Brian also added some other really helpful comments a few days ago when I mentioned I was trying to decide between building a GA 25 or a Jumbo 24. Both are great boats of course and to some extent it involves hair splitting when they are so close in length. Brian said:

"The other difference between the hulls is the more monohedron type hull on the GA ...lower deadrise amidships where most of the lift is generated.  This would make the hull form more efficient, but it's hard to say if it's enough to make up for the wider beam, and nothing beats a side by side comparison.  Nobody's built a GA shorter than 26'.  The one on my web page is 26' long, aluminum ...but built lightly and weighs about the same as the same thing built from wood/epoxy/glass.  It's the closest one 'to spec' ...He (Butch V.) gets 3.5+ mpg offshore in Oregon.  Weight is the other factor ...and the biggest factor, and really hard to compare since 2 different builders of the same boat, let alone different boats, are very likely to produce boats of significantly different weight.  The GA is built a little heavier than the Jumbo, which would hurt fuel efficiency.  Who knows which is better ...worse ...or the same?  Butch's experience sounds like he get a quarter of a mile per gallon better than your stretch Jumbo, with a 26-footer, which is a totally meaningless comparison ...except to say "in the noise" and "not a factor" at worst.

Brian

PS: Butch is using a 140 hp Suzuki 4-stroke on his 26-foot Great Alaskan and says that it is totally adequate on his boat ...but dogged down a tad once or twice when making a steep turn into a steep swell.  FYI... it's evidence that both the J and GA can use the same mill when built to similar lengths tho'"

 53 
 on: December 13, 2014, 06:19:56 PM 
Started by David Nolan - Last post by penguin
I would love to build one of the 8'-6" beam models.  What's the difference between the GA and Neil's superjumbo?

There was a thread on this exact issue a while back. Here's what Brian said:

"The GA is both longer and wider, being designed for the longer lengths (26'-28') rather than being a 'stretched' version of a boat designed for the shorter (22') length.  It is also proportionately deeper than the Tolman Jumbo.  It has a finer entry and a more efficient hull (lower deadrise amidships).  While the GA is larger, it still achieves similar fuel efficiency as the Jumbo.  Otherwise, the boats are similar and take a similar amount of time to build.  They use (95%) the same construction techniques."

 54 
 on: December 13, 2014, 06:04:37 PM 
Started by starbright55 - Last post by adam_k
Penguin, it's not a deal breaker, but working in a tarp tent pretty much limits you to the spring and summer months.  I built under a tarp tent in the SF bay area, and it is cool and humid enough in the winter to keep the epoxy from curing properly and making amine blush.  Amine blush is a pain to clean off and will keep other layers of epoxy from sticking.  However, once the hull is complete, you can cover it over with tarps to keep in the heat, and set up halogen lamps or electric heaters.  Fire safety goes without saying. Roll Eyes

 55 
 on: December 13, 2014, 05:54:20 PM 
Started by luk diver - Last post by adam_k
Hi Bob, glad to hear Helena is at home.  May she have a speedy recovery.

 56 
 on: December 13, 2014, 05:51:23 PM 
Started by David Nolan - Last post by adam_k
I would love to build one of the 8'-6" beam models.  What's the difference between the GA and Neil's superjumbo? 

 57 
 on: December 13, 2014, 03:56:47 PM 
Started by captainfogfish - Last post by David Nolan
Use quick fair or make your own.    It will use less and you can trowel it on and fill the weave.     Sands quick too.     

If I was a fairer, that's what I'd do.    It works well


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 58 
 on: December 13, 2014, 03:48:24 PM 
Started by Jimbo - Last post by Jimbo
I'm pretty well recovered from the hernia surgery. Of course work goes WOT at the same time. Not complaining though.

Making every effort to do something on the build every day, even if that means looking through the scraps of plywood and calculating what I can use where.

Today I used a bunch of scraps to make some sumps for the scupper holes. Probably won't make a difference one way or another, but I hate wasting perfectly good materials.

 59 
 on: December 13, 2014, 12:59:25 PM 
Started by David Nolan - Last post by David Nolan
Crush Navy.   


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 60 
 on: December 13, 2014, 10:08:57 AM 
Started by luk diver - Last post by tananaBrian
Finally escaped hospital and home now. Attitude is pretty good and she'll be just fine. My diet is all gone to hell but she'll be in the kitchen sooner than later. That probably bothers her more than anything. Looking forward to 2015, has to be better. B & B

All good news!  Glad to hear it!  Now go get yourself a big pizza... Smiley

Brian


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