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 51 
 on: August 26, 2015, 04:32:17 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by AlasKen
Those are super slick but definitely salty as far as price goes.


That is why I use the buoy and son method.  My 35 y/o son goes to the front and deploys and retrieves via the buoy.  I drive the boat.  When alone I try not to need to anchor although I can do it with my wife.  In that case I get to go up front and she drives.  Funny how that works.  Ken

 52 
 on: August 26, 2015, 04:26:21 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by gdwamsley
Those are super slick but definitely salty as far as price goes.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk


 53 
 on: August 26, 2015, 04:17:05 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by Cannon
Ken,
you made some very strong points! First, having to get up there in pitching seas is no fun, especially with no place to brace. I was somewhat worried about that with my plan to use an anchor winch. That is one of the reasons that I was looking at that solution, I am well over the 200 mark and I am not fat... Railing seemed to give some sense of security, but like I said, I am well over the 200# mark and the momentum of my body against the railing wouldn't be pretty. So I am thinking possibly I need to rethink my plans. I had considered the hatch in the cuddy as you mentioned, and I think that I will probably do that regardless. It would be nice to be able to access the bow without hanging my big butt over the side in rough conditions.

Some notes on anchor windlasses: there is a vertical post model and a horizontal post model. The horizontal post model works better and deposits the rode (chain or rope) in the anchor well. The vertical post requires more fall, 18" or more in order to work best. The horizontal model deposits the rode through a hatch or hole into the locker. I was not thinking of the spool variety, I have never been a fan of that type of winch. An example of the windlass I was considering https://www.fisheriessupply.com/lewmar-pro-fish-horizontal-windlass

I have also considered the Columbia river system which I have used for years. It works off of a pulley system and a buoy much like you mentioned. A lot less work than hauling an anchor rode of 300 plus feet along with an anchor on the end. this system works very well, but the more chain, the more you have to do by hand. http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0266/2799/products/buoy_ball-and-anchor_puller-complete_400_1024x1024.jpg?v=1378666903 Anchoring on the Columbia can be a life or death situation, determined by how safe you make it and your proximity to others or their proximity to you. It gets real hairy when some idiot doesn't know what he is doing and hooks up to your rode...

In any event, the latter system was my original choice, but I was looking to spend less time on the bow. The windlass can be operated with a simple switch, and handles both rope and chain. That means that 1.) I'm not on the bow 99% of the time and B.) I can go with my own choice in rode length which is not possible with the fixed spool model.

Bullet: As far as the anchor well draining, it would drain just like the original does, through scuppers at the back corners on either side.

 54 
 on: August 26, 2015, 04:12:41 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by Stephen
I have a traditional well and it works fine. More of a concern for me is having the actual anchor very well secured. It gets banged around a lot, and you need some sort of mechanism to secure it beyond the simple hook or 'u' ring provided on the standard anchor roller. It can get scary as heck being in big seas and watching that anchor moving around and even jumping out of it's place!
Stephen

 55 
 on: August 26, 2015, 03:31:14 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by AlasKen
Well that is an excellent point and one I'll have to give some thought to. Safety is a big item with me. From my years sailing, I can definitely remember needing to get an anchor out from a pitching heaving deck.

I'm curious about your description of an anchor winch with the rode on a spool. I'm drawing a blank on what that looks like. Is that a homemade setup?

I was thinking something like this.  http://www.ezanchorproducts.com/#

 56 
 on: August 26, 2015, 02:53:12 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by tananaBrian
For reasons stated, I lean towards the original anchor well design.  I made mine deeper by a few inches though.  Another issue with a flush deck and having an anchor locker ...is where?  Should the anchor locker crowd the sleeping arrangements?  Or should you use the collision chamber for this, and perhaps have a longer route for the rode to pass through?  I like being able to see and work with the rode if I need to, and one of the reasons that I made the anchor well deeper is so that I could use a 'traditional' laundry basket for coiling the line into, but with low to no risk of the basket tipping out over the side.  Another option with a flush deck is to deploy the anchor through a hatch, standing inside the cuddy with only half of you above the deck... You can do that with either anchor solution.

Brian

 57 
 on: August 26, 2015, 02:29:14 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by film842
First off I think you need to build it the way you want to.  Everyone has their own needs and desires.  I will just point out some items based on my experience.  I have been trying to deploy or retrieve an anchor and got tossed around by waves coming from unexpected directions.  I had to drop to my knees and grab the sides to feel safe.  If I didn't have the recessed anchor well I don't think it would have been as safe.  I have seen bow rails that were not terribly sturdy and would be suspect trying stop 200+ lbs of toppling man without giving way.  They also only had one rail allowing feet and perhaps body to slide under them if I was to slip.  One of the things I like about my Tolman is the anchor well as designed in the book.  I have had other friends with boats mention how much better they like that than their setup.  Although in all honesty that is a common theme throughout the boat.  If you have an anchor winch with the rode on a spool then you may not need to go up front to deploy.  We are retrieving with a buoy so one has to sit up front and one drive the boat.  Having somewhere solid to plan your feet is a must in that situation, at least for me.  

 
Ken    



Well that is an excellent point and one I'll have to give some thought to. Safety is a big item with me. From my years sailing, I can definitely remember needing to get an anchor out from a pitching heaving deck.

I'm curious about your description of an anchor winch with the rode on a spool. I'm drawing a blank on what that looks like. Is that a homemade setup?

 58 
 on: August 26, 2015, 02:13:08 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by AlasKen
First off I think you need to build it the way you want to.  Everyone has their own needs and desires.  I will just point out some items based on my experience.  I have been trying to deploy or retrieve an anchor and got tossed around by waves coming from unexpected directions.  I had to drop to my knees and grab the sides to feel safe.  If I didn't have the recessed anchor well I don't think it would have been as safe.  I have seen bow rails that were not terribly sturdy and would be suspect trying stop 200+ lbs of toppling man without giving way.  They also only had one rail allowing feet and perhaps body to slide under them if I was to slip.  One of the things I like about my Tolman is the anchor well as designed in the book.  I have had other friends with boats mention how much better they like that than their setup.  Although in all honesty that is a common theme throughout the boat.  If you have an anchor winch with the rode on a spool then you may not need to go up front to deploy.  We are retrieving with a buoy so one has to sit up front and one drive the boat.  Having somewhere solid to plan your feet is a must in that situation, at least for me.  

With that said I think you need to do what you feel is best for your use and your level of risk.  The fact is when you get on your boat, even in your driveway you have some risk.  If you try and remove all risk you will not be able to use your boat, go fishing, or get our of bed.  And then you have a whole other set of risks to worry about.  I say move forward with your design.  If you don't like it use your sawsall and change it.  If you are going to mount a winch, especially a drum style make sure you have the beef to support it.  

As to you front cuddy bulkhead mine is a little shorter than spec.  What I did was stand at my steering station and use a cardboard cutout of the bulkhead shape.  I then trimmed it back until I could just see the shelf and used that as my height.  I think I trimmed it down a couple of inches.  Not really noticeable but any lower would have no benefit.  
Ken    


 59 
 on: August 26, 2015, 01:59:01 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by bullet
How will the locker drain?

 60 
 on: August 26, 2015, 01:30:05 PM 
Started by film842 - Last post by film842
Thanks guys. Two good points to think about. Yes I'm planning a cuddy cabin but I might be lowering the forward cuddy bunkhead since It seems that the standard design might impede view from the pilothouse a little bit. Still out to lunch on that one. I picture that I would sit on the cuddy and operate the anchor (with hopefully a winch) or plan two, send someone else to do it.

My plan also is to have bow rails since I'm not getting any younger and I know I'll have kids on the boat at one point or another.

If one builds an anchor well, should the inside be beefed up in any special way?

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