FishyFish Tolman Alaskan Skiff and Boat Building Forums Back to Fishyfish
March 03, 2015, 09:28:18 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
CNC Sign Carving

Sign cutting, & carving. CNC milling. SaltWaterWorkshop.com

News: How to build a boat. How to build your own boat. How to build a skiff. Do it Yourself Boat Building. Stitch and Glue Boat Building. Wood, Epoxy, and Fiberglass Boats.
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10
 21 
 on: February 27, 2015, 04:09:45 PM 
Started by luk diver - Last post by luk diver
 I'll pull that harness connector apart and clean/lube contacts. That and fuel-flow meter is acting strange in that I have fuel flow but 'total burned' isn't racking up gallons. Just some strange stuff maybe coincidental? Haven't looked at weather but so far looks like I can get out next weekend and test new CDI and other repairs with a 6g tank aboard just in case. Going to pull flow meter and check turbine is clear and change out fuel filter. Engine doesn't use any oil and runs as strong as before so really think we can get it running and use it for several seasons. Don't think it's a 'cold start' issue as started normal and idle dropped back down after warm up like always. Thanks B & B

 22 
 on: February 27, 2015, 12:13:20 PM 
Started by luk diver - Last post by AKExplore
Luk Diver,

Does the motor initially idle fast, choke is engaged, and then idle down to the normal rpms, choke not engaged, before you headed out on the water? 

When I had a voltage regulator get fried on one of our Yamaha F100's, I could start the motor and it would do the cold engine fast dle, but would then die.  A solenoid which should turn off the choke after the engine reached operating temperature was not getting an electrical signal to turn off the choke.  Thus the engine was running too rich and would die.

I too belive you have an electrical issue and not strictly a fuel issue.  Maybe unplug the harness and look at the connections for corrosion, small particles, etc, since the mechanic had unplugged it.  I have used Corrosion Block in the past to clean electrical connections when I was having intermittent electrical problems.

Good luck.

Doug

 23 
 on: February 27, 2015, 09:45:21 AM 
Started by elkhunter338 - Last post by Dave Wright
It just might be, as solid wood gets shittier and ply gets more expensive, that you could strip build the shelves from rippings cut from big box store lumber. Strips in convenient lengths of 3/4" wide by 1 1/8" deep could be laminated up right on top of the template. Six strips would give 4.5 inch wide shelves.

That is a pretty good idea actually. I think that if I had a work surface big enough I could make a shelf that way in two hours or so. Time to lay out the shape, rip and laminate up included. probably use a pint of epoxy. The second would go faster. I would probably bevel the ends of each piece so that I have a 45 degree "scarf" at the end joints to help with holding in the form shape. The biggest potential problem would be having enough clamps.

nice thinking outside the box Dave.

Jerryd

The idea is not original. Lots of designers / builders have strip built various hull / deck sections. For example, the Tracy O'Brien designs have sheer decks (equivalent to shelves) formed from ten 3/4" X 3/4" mahogany strips.  But he supports these sheer decks with a dozen or so knees - added complication.

The neat thing Renn did was to make his shelves beefy enough to be self supporting without additional knees or frames, and then prove the concept was stout enough by building dozens of boats with it.

 24 
 on: February 27, 2015, 05:58:20 AM 
Started by luk diver - Last post by pfithian
I suggest tracing all of the wiring from the console to the engine. Remove each connector, squirt some contact cleaner on each side, and reassemble.

In the automotive world, connectors are responsible for more electical issues than any other source.

 25 
 on: February 27, 2015, 05:51:09 AM 
Started by elkhunter338 - Last post by pfithian
It just might be, as solid wood gets shittier and ply gets more expensive, that you could strip build the shelves from rippings cut from big box store lumber. Strips in convenient lengths of 3/4" wide by 1 1/8" deep could be laminated up right on top of the template. Six strips would give 4.5 inch wide shelves.

Great idea. Use PL Premium, as its bond strength is greater than the adhesive bonding the verniers and it fills gaps.

 26 
 on: February 27, 2015, 05:44:03 AM 
Started by elkhunter338 - Last post by jerry bark
It just might be, as solid wood gets shittier and ply gets more expensive, that you could strip build the shelves from rippings cut from big box store lumber. Strips in convenient lengths of 3/4" wide by 1 1/8" deep could be laminated up right on top of the template. Six strips would give 4.5 inch wide shelves.

That is a pretty good idea actually. I think that if I had a work surface big enough I could make a shelf that way in two hours or so. Time to lay out the shape, rip and laminate up included. probably use a pint of epoxy. The second would go faster. I would probably bevel the ends of each piece so that I have a 45 degree "scarf" at the end joints to help with holding in the form shape. The biggest potential problem would be having enough clamps.

nice thinking outside the box Dave.

Jerry

 27 
 on: February 27, 2015, 05:41:08 AM 
Started by luk diver - Last post by luk diver
 Thanks for suggestions. Just $400 for a new CDI so went that direction. Should be on-line by next weekend and next run will have 6g tank as backup.  Have plenty of time before fishing season to sort out this problem or re-engine. Thanks. B &B

 28 
 on: February 27, 2015, 05:35:01 AM 
Started by gdwamsley - Last post by jerry bark

Just laid the 3rd coat on tonight as the weave was still partially exposed after coat number 2.  I picked up a 6 inch putty knife while I was out today and used that to spread the epoxy.  Used another18 oz of epoxy.


having the weave partially exposed after you lay up the glass is, IMO, an indication that you got just the right amount of epoxy. You want just enough to barely wet the cloth and sounds like you hit it right first time.

I will suggest that you might wait to do the 3rd coat until you have the hull built, just an option because its not needed for strength only to make the surface easier to sand smooth and paint.

Congrats!
Jerry

 29 
 on: February 27, 2015, 05:26:12 AM 
Started by luk diver - Last post by jerry bark
almost certainly an electrical issue. I do not know what kind of electronics runs one of those so I can't help there.

Back in the old days, this would be a problem when the condenser went bad in the distributor. of course condensers are not used in your motor. Coils would do this too, get hot and quit, cool down and run.

If I were trying to solve with a parts replacing strategy the electronic ignition box would be my guess, but that's pricey for you i think.

Jerry

 30 
 on: February 27, 2015, 12:03:52 AM 
Started by luk diver - Last post by AlasKen
I had the same thing happen 35 years ago on a 2 stroke.  It would work fine for 1/2 an hour and then just die.  We would just drink a cold beer and when finished it would start right back up.  This was on NM lakes in the hot summer.  We decided it was a feature and not a bug.  Replaced the electronic ignition box.  Problem went away.  Mechanic said he was told the circuit board had a crack that would create an open when it got hot and then close when cooled.  sounds similar.  Hope you get it figured out.

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10
CNC Sign Carving

Sign cutting, & carving. CNC milling. SaltWaterWorkshop.com

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!