Recent Posts

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21
General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: My GA build
« Last post by Cannon on May 22, 2018, 07:45:55 AM »
Over the last two years, I have remodeled some of my electrical and in so doing have found that dielectric grease is a savior of electrical systems in a saltwater environment. As I pointed out above, a good pair of crimpers are essential in ensuring the seal of water tight ring and butt connections are not compromised by nicking the shrink tubing. Every exposed wire should be coated with dielectric grease prior to installing ring and butt connections!
Another point would be to properly mount your wiring so it is not laying in areas of moisture accumulation, such as the wiring for your bilge pumps. Securing it up and out of the water will ensure longevity in your system. I ran a piece of small PVC pipe over my bilge to attach the wiring for both the pumps and the switches. I used zip ties to hold the wiring in place, keeping it neat and out of the slime in the bilge.
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General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: My GA build
« Last post by tananaBrian on May 22, 2018, 06:03:42 AM »
Part of the problem with hooking up to power provided by the dock is that they may not have maintained their system, or even wired it correctly, so the ground potential may not actually be anywhere near earth ground.  Just one of the many reasons you should not go swimming at the dock near boats that are hooked up to shore power (grounded to the zincs on their boat) ... people die from stuff like that.

One thing to point out on the observation that dielectric grease needs to be used on all bare metal in your wiring is that offshore, you aren't necessarily ever going to get sea water on your terminals ... you may think.  But for those that spend a lot of time offshore, they know how the whole boat gets slimy feeling and how the moisture in the air is carrying salt to every nook and cranny ... this is what corrodes everything near the beach / ocean.  Use drip loops.  Expect to have to replace everything and keep that in mind as you route wires and place equipment.

Brian
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General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Vacuum Bagging
« Last post by Todd j on May 22, 2018, 05:42:06 AM »
 Without writing a book.  what is vacuum bagging?
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Tolman Skiff Adventures / Re: Washington to the Bahamas
« Last post by tananaBrian on May 22, 2018, 05:13:29 AM »
Thanks for the info on the Awlgrip ... I've always crossed it off the list as something needing a genuine spray shop, e.g. pay someone else, to apply.  :)

Brian

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Tolman Skiff Adventures / Re: Washington to the Bahamas
« Last post by Cordell on May 21, 2018, 09:59:33 PM »
I've heard Awlgrip is stenchy and hard to apply, but tough as nails and worth it .... yours looks great!  Did you spray, or have it sprayed?  How'd you go about painting?

Thanks for the link on the hinged deck plates... I didn't know Cabelas had those

Brian

Yes I was happy to find the hatches. Not alot of good options that are this flush.

 Awlgrip was rolled on with foam roller tipped with foam brush. It was actually really forgiving to work with as long as you got it on thin enough. We were even able to go back and touch up runs and sags after a few minutes and it would smooth back out like you never touched it. Our biggest problem was dust control in a shop that had been sanded in for a couple years. Tuff so far. Got a couple dings but touched up easily enough.
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General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: My GA build
« Last post by Cannon on May 21, 2018, 08:53:27 PM »
I am just about ready to move the Paula J over to Newport. Punch list is nearly complete. I ended up installing four shorepower circuits. I had planned on only two circuits, one for the charger, and one for an electric heater. The Breaker panel came with four breakers installed with the option of adding two more so I decided to go ahead and utilize at least the four. That meant ordering more wire to run the additional two circuits.
In the process, I bought a wire stripper and a ratcheting crimper. Both tools have proven to be a great addition to my tool chest! The ratcheting crimper was the best purchase, especially after using the old cheapo unit. It makes a perfect crimp every time, without breaking the skin on water tight ring connections. I wish I had purchased both of these tools years ago!
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002STTSY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000IYTCG6/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I got a pair of those crimpers when I started wireing our boat and had the same thought. Makes a better crimp for sure as well as ease of use. Great tool as is that style stripper!

Did you ground your shore power to the negative DC buss?
That was one of our punchlist items from the surveyor. 
We had out boat plugged in to a gfi oulet in the bahamas for a couple weeks and I'm afraid there was something off with the grounging there. We ended up eating a zink off of the motor bracket.
To be quite honest, I’m not planning on tying them together.  I have heard a couple of horror stories in regards to that. There is no logical reason to tie them, they are completely separate systems.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
27
General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: My GA build
« Last post by Cordell on May 21, 2018, 08:23:53 PM »
I am just about ready to move the Paula J over to Newport. Punch list is nearly complete. I ended up installing four shorepower circuits. I had planned on only two circuits, one for the charger, and one for an electric heater. The Breaker panel came with four breakers installed with the option of adding two more so I decided to go ahead and utilize at least the four. That meant ordering more wire to run the additional two circuits.
In the process, I bought a wire stripper and a ratcheting crimper. Both tools have proven to be a great addition to my tool chest! The ratcheting crimper was the best purchase, especially after using the old cheapo unit. It makes a perfect crimp every time, without breaking the skin on water tight ring connections. I wish I had purchased both of these tools years ago!
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002STTSY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000IYTCG6/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I got a pair of those crimpers when I started wireing our boat and had the same thought. Makes a better crimp for sure as well as ease of use. Great tool as is that style stripper!

Did you ground your shore power to the negative DC buss?
That was one of our punchlist items from the surveyor. 
We had out boat plugged in to a gfi oulet in the bahamas for a couple weeks and I'm afraid there was something off with the grounging there. We ended up eating a zink off of the motor bracket.
28
General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Comments from Widebody owners.
« Last post by Cannon on May 21, 2018, 07:08:11 PM »
Rather than deal with the screens in the scuppers, use SS scrub pads. Keeps things in the boat, easily removed to clean.
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General Discussion Tolman Skiffs / Re: Vacuum Bagging
« Last post by Cannon on May 21, 2018, 06:56:57 PM »
Now that is a boat! I would also like the armament for those days when people cut me off🤠
30
G’day Easygoing, well actually Yes it does look really good and modern without them,  but I do hope it looks better with spray rails and also that the spray rails work as I’m putting them on at the moment.

I would def like to hear if there are differences with the reverse chine also.

Ben
I definitely agree with luc diver on the secondary spray rails. I almost didn’t put them on, but now I’m glad I did! The secondary rails act much like the reverse chine (because they are at the angle of the sides as opposed to the chines) keeping spray off the bow diverted down. The main spray rails catch the majority of the balance unless you have a cross wind.
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